Processing - the second act of a photograph's journey from idea to art

Posted on June 1st, 2018

I always want to get as much of the shot right when I frame my shot and make my exposure. However, the more I study my heroes in photography, I realize that processing is a vital second act that prepare the art for printing and/or publishing. My goal when processing is to complete and complement the composition. I will check to make sure the image is perfectly level; and sometimes I will reframe the shot to be square or wide depending on format I wish to print or publish. Then especially when dealing with RAW format (which is quite flat and boring without at least the internal camera JPEG processor) I consider what I remember the scene as I shot it and make adjustments to help the image look like what inspired me to open the shutter in the first place. I do not like to “photoshop" things that were or were not in the original frame (though sometimes, I will remove a blemish caused by such things as dust on my sensor or lens that causes a blemish in an otherwise beautiful sky) rather usually my processing is relatively subtle with only minor tweaks to highlights, shadow, and exposure adjustments; sometimes some play with vibrancy and saturation; and perhaps finishing with some contrast I want to draw the viewer into the image, to help make them feel what I felt when I was experiencing the scene live.


Lighting is a crutial part of a great photo and will captivate the viewer to lean in and interact

Posted on May 29th, 2018

Those of you who know me, have heard my passion for helping enhance story by targeting the subconscious. As a cinematographer and photographer, I am quite passionate about using lighting to help the viewer immerse themselves in the scene. I want to “break the fourth wall" (which you’ve heard and read me talk about the scene breaking out of especially with live production) but sometimes (especially with photography) I do by drawing the viewer in closer to the scene… Consider how the shapes of your subject and background elements and how they interact will tell your story. Our brains are designed to seek these things out. One of the main challenges we have as photographers is to demonstrate a 3D world in a 2D format. To do this well, good photographers see (and understand how to capture) the light (and shadows) that interacts with these subjects to make a scene come alive.


Contemplating a faithful life

Posted on May 24th, 2018

I wrote the following paragraph to a friend who shared a eulogy for someone they knew that lived a good life. My friend finished by writing, “...I keep thinking of all the phenomenal people in the world who never make the news, never make a scene, but just faithfully live their lives with Jesus making the world a better place…"

This is really beautiful to read and contemplate what a faithful life looks like. Thank you. Your final sentences remind me of the verse in 1 Timothy that I’ve been prayer breathing the past week: “The aim of our charge is love that issues from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith." I’ve witnessed a few funerals where we got to remember a life well lived; and I’ve also spent time thinking about some of the people that are and have been heroes and mentors to me. It reminds me of what such men as Bob Maravelli (youth leader in Pittsburgh - who shared Jesus teaching of the narrow path being preferable to the wide road) and a young Brett Ray shared in the first year of my barely decided faith. More so than what they shared, but the sincerity that they shared it with and the chance to have seen them live over the years since... I want to live my life like such as you and them.

Freedom from creative jealousy

Posted on May 20th, 2018

“Creativity and ego cannot go together; but if you free yourself from the comparing and the jealous mind, creativity opens up endlessly."
-Jeong Kwan

I was scanning through some articles in a photography blog that I follow and caught an article by Rajib Mukherjee (https://www.picturecorrect.com/tips/creative-jealousy-and-how-to-deal-with-it-as-a-photographer/) featuring thoughts a photographer named Sean Tucker. He shared about how he struggles with creative envy. I certainly resonate with this as I go through seasons from time time to time, when because of spiraling down into jealous thoughts of others’ successes, I fail to be who I am best at being. I love the first thought shared by Chef Jeong Kwan as featured in Chef’s Table.

I commit to focussing on being the most excellent version of me.

"Remember that the mark of a [great] professional is that they run their own race; they're not constantly comparing themselves to others. They're not threatened by the work that other produce. They’re too busy doing what they do. They don’t allow jealousy to take up emotional and mental space."
-Sean Tucker



Volunteering as part of the Troy Production & Arts team

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Lot’s of you ask about what volunteering as part of the Troy Production & Arts team is like. This video let’s some of our volunteers tell you in their own words!


Champions again

Posted on April 29th, 2018

So grateful to get to play with these guys every week! I’ll be proud to wear my hoodie and think about these friends and the path to victory we experienced.




serving artistic leadership and the thrill of live production

Posted on March 29th, 2018

I snapped this passage from a magazine to share with my team. Beyond just being for a video director, these are good thoughts to contemplate regardless of our position - serving the artistic vision and the thrill of live production when supporting and enhancing art and communication

  • Be flexible
  • Give up your ego
  • Collaboration and comfort

  • The thrill of being live and having the eyes on your work can be quite rewarding
  • Don’t go over the top, but rather enjoy being fully in the moment
  • We get to have joy in what we produce!




APEST

Posted on March 7th, 2018

Lots of you know that I am passionate about helping people find their best fit as part of the Body of Christ. In general, I nerd out with organizational leadership thoughts. I really like the language that Dave Gibbons uses for the APEST roles in the Church. This chart takes the language from the book of Ephesians and gives business titles and explanation of the roles.

*FYI, I’m 1A, 2E



Thoughts while hearing Dave Gibbons

Posted on February 1st, 2018

Scarcity can lead to clarity

Love supersedes laws
Let grace win
If they’re ever in battle, let Love win!

The mystery of Jesus is beautiful to me!!

My “ministry" should be about other people’s dreams.

Prophecy - seeing what God sees and sharing what He would share

“Artists" are willing to take risks

Be willing to change “uniforms" and wear the one that fits your identity best
Be you. Be free!

Life sometimes still holds the necessary mundane. But it is a mobis that is also flying on Aslan’s back...

The best words cannot capture the greatest experience. Jesus’ revelation!

Forgot the past; He is writing a new book.

Leadership Gathering January 2018

Posted on January 26th, 2018


Eric Wolfe

Visual Artist. Production Designer and Consultant. Developer of Ideas. Maximizer of Resources. Strategic Thinker. Creative Innovator. Husband. Father. Philosopher. Photographer. Backpacker. Athlete. Cook. Artisan. Catch Eric’s sporadic musings at egwolfe.com or follow him on social media platforms as @egwolfe